Oracle ZFS Storage Appliances – OS 8.7

A new version for your ZFS storage appliances is here; OS 8.7 with some new and nice features and a new hardware configuration as an all flash array…

Oracle Support Document 2021771.1 (Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance: Software Updates) can be found at:
https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=2021771.1

 

Some of my favourites:

OISP 2.0

The big advantages running your Oracle Database on Oracle Storage when using Oracle Intelligent Storage Protocol bring new capabilities that increase Oracle Database performance. It prioritizes IOs based on database hints, effectively increases online transaction processing using different cache and IO settings on your ZFSSA, all without special configurations and without database or storage administrator intervention. New Analytic functions for OISP bytes and operations. Statistics can be broken down by client, filename, database name, database filetype, database function, share, and project, latency, size, and offset. In a multi-tenant environment you will be able to find problems within some clicks, that’s very cool.

Data Deduplication v2

In the past it was not a good idea to enable deduplication if you were not really using it, had less files dedup’able or being dedicated as a dedup destination because you needed a lot of memory for your dedup matrix… with this release you get a designate SSD meta cache device(s) for to hold your deduplication metadata tables as well as other metadata. In addition you can enable deduplicated replication.

New Protocols

We have now SMB 3.0 which enables transparent failover and multichannel. We got NFS 4.1 and have the HTTP Object Store to save data as storage objects through the Swift Object Store protocol.

Replication

A bunch of new features like resumable replication, no more need to uncompress/compress raw disk blocks on send, auto snapshot management and schedule configuration, lag alerts and increased number of simultaneous streams.

Cloud?

Oracle announced the new firmware as “the cloud storage” and says you can use your Oracle Storage Cloud subscription as backend storage and your local I/O is on your flash drives (read/write-zillas). I read the documentation, the online wiki and clicked on every button on the GUI but I could not find anything about that feature… the only thing in the release notes is a marked bug being solved called “want zfs pools based on cloud storage devices” but I have no clue how to configure that. Perhaps Oracle marketing guys know more than their engineers. 🙂

But the features sounds very nice and I really want to test it how that could perform…

Oracle OSwatcher

OSWatcher (oswbb) is a collection of UNIX shell scripts intended to collect and archive operating system and network metrics to aid support in diagnosing performance issues. It is small, simple and easy to use, but not that killer tool at all… but you get come graphs and a report with some “clicks” and you mind find issues you could further investigate…

OS Watcher

OS Watcher

A small and nice tool provided by Oracle to analyze your system performance:

Oracle Support Document 461053.1 (OSWatcher Analyzer User Guide) can be found at: https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=461053.1

This would start the tool and collect data at 30 second intervals and log the last 1 hours of data to archive files

root@solaris:/h/u/user# tar xf oswbb734.tar
root@solaris:/h/u/user# cd oswbb
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb# ls
analysis                   Exampleprivate.net         OSWatcher.sh               oswsub.sh                  tar_up_partial_archive.sh
call_du.sh                 ifconfigsub.sh             OSWatcherFM.sh             profile                    tarupfiles.sh
call_sar.sh                iosub.sh                   oswbba.jar                 psmemsub.sh                vmsub.sh
call_uptime.sh             ltop.sh                    oswib.sh                   src                        xtop.sh
docs                       mpsub.sh                   oswnet.sh                  startOSWbb.sh
Example_extras.txt         nfssub.sh                  oswrds.sh                  stopOSWbb.sh
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb#
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb#
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb#
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb# ./startOSWbb.sh 30 1
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb# Setting the archive log directory to/h/u/user/oswbb/archive

Testing for discovery of OS Utilities...
VMSTAT found on your system.
IOSTAT found on your system.
MPSTAT found on your system.
IFCONFIG found on your system.
NETSTAT found on your system.
TOP found on your system.

Testing for discovery of OS CPU COUNT
oswbb is looking for the CPU COUNT on your system
CPU COUNT will be used by oswbba to automatically look for cpu problems

CPU COUNT found on your system.
CPU COUNT = 8

Discovery completed.

Starting OSWatcher v7.3.3  on Wed Mar 29 10:50:22 CEST 2017
With SnapshotInterval = 30
With ArchiveInterval = 1

OSWatcher - Written by Carl Davis, Center of Expertise,
Oracle Corporation
For questions on install/usage please go to MOS (Note:301137.1)
If you need further assistance or have comments or enhancement
requests you can email me Carl.Davis@Oracle.com

Data is stored in directory: /h/u/user/oswbb/archive

Starting Data Collection...

oswbb heartbeat:Wed Mar 29 10:50:27 CEST 2017
[...]
oswbb heartbeat:Wed Mar 29 12:10:45 CEST 2017
<ctrl z>
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb#
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb#
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb# ./stopOSWbb.sh
root@solaris:/h/u/user/oswbb# java -jar oswbba.jar -i ./archive/

Starting OSW Analyzer V7.3.3
OSWatcher Analyzer Written by Oracle Center of Expertise
Copyright (c)  2014 by Oracle Corporation

Parsing Data. Please Wait...

This directory already exists. Rewriting...
Scanning file headers for version and platform info...


Parsing file solaris_iostat_17.03.29.1100.dat ...
Parsing file solaris_iostat_17.03.29.1200.dat ...


Parsing file solaris_vmstat_17.03.29.1100.dat ...
Parsing file solaris_vmstat_17.03.29.1200.dat ...

Parsing file solaris_netstat_17.03.29.1100.dat ...
Parsing file solaris_netstat_17.03.29.1200.dat ...


Parsing file solaris_top_17.03.29.1100.dat ...
Parsing file solaris_top_17.03.29.1200.dat ...


Parsing file solaris_ps_17.03.29.1100.dat ...
Parsing file solaris_ps_17.03.29.1200.dat ...


Parsing Completed.





Enter 1 to Display CPU Process Queue Graphs
Enter 2 to Display CPU Utilization Graphs
Enter 3 to Display CPU Other Graphs
Enter 4 to Display Memory Graphs
Enter 5 to Display Disk IO Graphs

Enter 6 to Generate All CPU Gif Files
Enter 7 to Generate All Memory Gif Files
Enter 8 to Generate All Disk Gif Files

Enter L to Specify Alternate Location of Gif Directory
Enter T to Alter Graph Time Scale Only (Does not change analysis dataset)
Enter D to Return to Default Graph Time Scale
Enter R to Remove Currently Displayed Graphs

Enter A to Analyze Data
Enter S to Analyze Subset of Data(Changes analysis dataset including graph time scale)

Enter P to Generate A Profile
Enter X to Export Parsed Data to File
Enter Q to Quit Program

Please Select an Option:

 

 

 

easy… after generating some graphs you can create a profile and open it with your browser:

Also the text report (enter A to analyze) is ok… nice overview, ToC:

###########################################################################
# Contents Of This Report:
#
# Section 1: System Status
# Section 2: System Slowdowns
#   Section 2.1: System Slowdown RCA Process Level Ordered By Impact
# Section 3: System General Findings
# Section 4: CPU Detailed Findings
#   Section 4.1: CPU Run Queue:
#   Section 4.2: CPU Utilization: Percent Busy
#   Section 4.3: CPU Utilization: Percent Sys
# Section 5: Memory Detailed Findings
#   Section 5.1: Memory: Process Swap Queue
#   Section 5.2: Memory: Scan Rate
#   Section 5.3  Memory: Page In:
#   Section 5.4  Memory: Page Tables (Linux only):
#   Section 5.5: Top 5 Memory Consuming Processes Beginning
#   Section 5.6: Top 5 Memory Consuming Processes Ending
# Section 6: Disk Detailed Findings
#   Section 6.1: Disk Percent Utilization Findings
#   Section 6.2: Disk Service Times Findings
#   Section 6.3: Disk Wait Queue Times Findings
#   Section 6.4: Disk Throughput Findings
#   Section 6.5: Disk Reads Per Second
#   Section 6.6: Disk Writes Per Second
# Section 7: Network Detailed Findings
#   Section 7.1  Network Data Link Findings
#   Section 7.2: Network IP Findings
#   Section 7.3: Network UDP Findings
#   Section 7.4: Network TCP Findings
# Section 8: Process Detailed Findings
#   Section 8.1: PS Process Summary Ordered By Time
#   Section 8.2: PS for Processes With Status = D or T Ordered By Time
#   Section 8.3: PS for (Processes with CPU > 0) When System Idle CPU < 30% Ordered By Time
#   Section 8.4: Top VSZ Processes Increasing Memory Per Snapshot
#   Section 8.5: Top RSS Processes Increasing Memory Per Snapshot
#
###########################################################################

Solaris 11.next

Well, what do you think about news that no Solaris 12 will be delivered… A lot of rumours and bad gossip came up from competitors …

To be honest looking back how hard it was to get Solaris 11 re-certifications from ISV and other software vendors it might be a nice idea to skip this versioning fight and just improve the OS with updates… I do not care if it is called Solaris 10/11/12/13 or just 11.4 / 11.5 a.s.o. if the features will get more and more and it stays as stable as it is… There are still a lot of Solaris 9 and even more 10 installations in the field by people just being afraid from 11…

Also M$ told us that Win10 will be the last version and btw… HP-UX is at version 11.00 since 1997 😉

Oracle promises a Solaris Support until 2031 today and there is a 5 year roadmap for Solaris and SPARC nowadays…

I am really looking forward to seeing Solaris 11.next releases and new SPARC+++CPUs…

See what John says:

PCI on SPARC

what cards are in my box?

# ipmitool sunoem cli "show -level all -output table /system/pci_devices/add-on description"
Connected. Use ^D to exit.
-> show -level all -output table /system/pci_devices/add-on description
Target             | Property              | Value
-------------------+-----------------------+-----------------------------------
/System/           | description           | Sun Dual Port 10 GbE PCIe 2.0 Low
 PCI_Devices/Add-  |                       | Profile Adapter, Base-T
 on/Device_3       |                       |
/System/           | description           | Oracle Storage 12 Gb SAS PCIe
 PCI_Devices/Add-  |                       | RAID HBA, Internal
 on/Device_4       |                       |


forcing solaris to look for chances

echo '#path_to_inst_bootstrap_1' > /etc/devices/path_to_inst Run: bootadm update-archive shutdown the computer change the PCIe card, for example a NIC with an HBA poweron again...

It is tempting here to manually modify /etc/devices/path_to_inst directly, replacing 8 and 9 with 10 and 11. But modification of path_to_inst file does not survive an upgrade. Any modification done to that file will be dropped after an upgrade. So bootstrapping path_to_inst file is the right persistent way. => Bootstrapping this file allows the box to force a rebuild of path_to_inst.

Oracle Soft- vs. Hard- Partitioning

Partitioning; like mentioned in the “Oracle Partitioning Policy”, when a server is separated into individual sections:
Soft partitioning examples
VMware, HyperV, RHEV, KVM, Xen

Hard partitioning examples
Solaris Zones, SPARC LDOM, IBM LPAR, Fujitsu PPAR, OracleVM for x86

When hard partitioning is in place you need to license only bound CPU cores. Live Migration between to hosts will never be covered and will need to license all cores. (Except Oracle’s Trusted Partitions in Exalogic, Exalytics, Exadata and PCA). Otherwise you will need to license all cores in a VM cluster with Soft Partitioning.

Special Cases in VMware

VMware >5.0
In earlier VMware releases running VMs could be moved within one cluster, therefor you needed to license all cores within this VMware cluster.
Customers built their own Oracle Cluster in their VMware farm…

VMware 5.1 – 5.5
With this version a VM could be moved across cluster boundaries in a vCenter. So you had to license all servers and cores within a vCenter.
Customers built their own Oracle vCenter installation.

VMware 6.0<
There is no longer need to have a shared storage and you could migrate VMs across vCenter instances. That requires you to license all physical servers running VMware in your company.  🙂
There are rumours saying that some customers had a special agreement with Oracle to use VMware with a special setup, separated and not routed VLANs, SAN zoning and so on… but you will have to get in touch with Oracle to create your own special customer definition which might certify your setup but I am sure that this will only be allowed exactly for the version you are running now.

What I would recommend my customers; take a look at Oracle on Oracle solutions and use a seperate VM software like OracleVM next to your VMware.

BTW; OVM is “for free”, you only need to pay for support. If you would use Oracle hardware, the support comes with the hardware support contract.

Please keep in mind that there are special setups for hard partitioning you will have to follow to be on the safe side…